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neck pain

Health, running, training

Zoom out – Rehabilitation with your eyes open

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The approach to treatment and rehabilitation is changing and for the better. Gone are the days (going anyway) of just treating the pain and symptoms. This approach lead to :

  • Short term outcomes: Pain relief, symptom relief (muscle spasm etc) and you feeling better.
  • Flare ups and frustration: But the pain kept coming back after these quick fixes.
  • Meaning more money spent in the long-term, more frustration and decreased quality of life.

The reason the quick fix approach doesn’t work for a lot of people is because the cause is not being addressed – The reason behind the pain and injury isn’t being rehabilitated.

When an injury, pain or niggles occurs you need to look above and below the area to find the contributing and causative factors.

Some examples? Here is a couple of common examples:

1. An office worker gets regular headaches that stops them doing what they love, playing on their mind and being very, very frustrating. They have had their neck treated in various ways – acupuncture, massage, trigger point release, joint mobilizations etc. All of these offer release – but they keep coming back!

bad posture and why it causes headachesOften the reason behind this is a rounded thoracic spine (upper back). This rounded spine pushes the head forward in a less than ideal position as you can see in the image to the right. This forward head position, one closes down the joint at the base of the skull and also every centimeter that the head is forward makes the neck muscles work four times harder! This will definitely cause muscle knots and stiff joints at the base of your skull AND headaches. So no matter how much you pull your head back, have the neck treated etc – If you do not treat your spine below the neck – You are going to keep getting headaches.

 

Patellofemoral pain syndrome. self treatment and rehab at home to decrease pain and get you back to it!

2. Another common example that will ring true with a lot of people, particularly runners, is anterior knee pain (Patello-femoral pain). Anterior knee pain is one of the most common running injuries and the pain happens because the knee cap doe not glide in its grove correctly. This is due to increased tension in your quads (particularly the outer quads) – pulling the knee cap laterally (to the outside) causing pain, inflammation and further muscle tension to due it grinding in the wrong place. Studies have shown that runners with PFPS have weak hip abductors and external rotators – This is a huge contributing factor as if these muscle are weak the knee is not controlled, in turns inwards, changing the tracking and position of the knee. So the knee can be treated, taped, dry-needled and exercises etc as much as you like but of hip strength and endurance isn’t improved then this will hang around and really frustrate.

 

 

core strength minimizes lower limb injuryIt is amazing how the body is connected, with no muscles and joints working in isolation. The body is full of synergies, with different muscles and tissues working together to move everything in unison, it really is an awesome machine.

But this is why when one thing goes wrong – multiple other areas can be affected. Other areas help out and work hard to compensate, some parts get more stress through them, leading to pain and niggles, that may bot be where the problem is!

 

This is why you need to rehab with your eyes open. If you have:

Look at your body holistically – Don’t just focus on the pain and getting a quick fix. Health care is changing; less pills, less anti-inflammatories, healthy food and less steroid injections – Become aware of your body and improve it for the long-term and Physioprescription is here to help you do that, giving you the tools, info and exercises to live better!

 

Please share, like and let me know how you get on!

 


Chronic Pain

Chronic pain – All in my head?

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Your central nervous system plays a massive role in ongoing and chronic pain, Here we will discuss why patients are often told pain is in their head and how you can help it train your brain.

chronic pain - is it in my head? - explained and how to fix itPain is subjective, meaning every single person responds to and feels it differently. This is because the pain receptors (nocioceptors) around your body sense something going on and send the signal up to your brain. How the brain processes/perceives this signal depends on a combination of things:

  • Gender: Hormones can affect perceived pain.
  • Family: How you were taught to react to pain as a child.
  • Past experience: The degree of pain felt in the past and how traumatic it was changes how your brain reacts to pain, for example.
  • Mood: Your mental state can affect how you feel pain. Things such as sadness, depression can increase pain perception. Be aware that it can also happen the other way around!

This is why there is a huge variety of pain tolerances in our society – the varying upbringings and experiences that occur in everyone’s lives.

Chronic pain and you:

Chronic pain is pain that exists after an acute injury has healed or after the normal tissue healing time (generalized to 3 months). For one reason or another reason, the injury does not fully heal (this could be because of some overlooked contributing factor but often for unknown reasons) and the nerve fibers continue to send pain signals up to the brain. With all these signals shooting up to the brain telling it that there is something bad going on, the brain begins to accept these like they are a normal thing, improving the pain pathways, making them more efficient. This results in more pain. Also along with this the chemical messengers that are used in the pain network increase and over time the threshold (how much stimulus is needed) for pain lowers.

Put more simply, with the continued and increased pain signals the brain gets used to them, think of them as normal and becomes more sensitive to them so a smaller and less intense stimulus is needed to feel pain! This is called Central Sensitization.

This is why people are often told that “it is in your head” and yes your brain is definitely contributing to your pain because it has become more sensitive but ALL PAIN IS REAL.

So how can we mitigate the effects of chronic pain and reduce the pain? Try some of these steps:

  1. Relax: Stress and tension will increase pain so practice relaxation techniques – these are easy and can reduce pain by up to 50%. There are multiple options here, find something that works for you! e.g. relaxation.
  2. Keep active: Physical activity boosts endorphins (natural pain-killer), boosts the immune system and helps get your body stronger!
  3. Get serious about rehabbing yourself – find out what you need to do from a Physio that will find your deficits and get to it, regularly and you will improve.
  4. Find appropriate healthcare providers e.g. a doctor that specializes in pain management, a psychologist and a physiotherapist that not only looks at your injury but you as a person.
  5. Eat healthy and don’t over indulge (no overeating, excess alcohol or tobacco consumption).
  6. Drink enough water: Females over 2 litres and men over 2.5 liters.
  7. Get enough sleep: Infants need about 16 hours per day, teenagers need about 9 and for most adults 7 to 8 hours a day is the best amount.
  8. Positive: Get social support by going to events etc that you enjoy(sports, music, dancing etc.) and keep positive people around you, not negative.

Remember all pain is real and everyone experiences it in a different way and most importantly it is NOT something you have to live with. It can be helped and improved.

Please like, share and comment.

 

You may also like:

5 great exercises for neck pain

Mobilise yourself!

 


Mobility, neck pain, Shoulder pain

Myofascial Release: Tight neck and shoulder self-treatment!

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Everyone gets tight neck and shoulders, whether you are an athlete, office worker or new-mum and this easy myofascial release will give you huge relief!

How does this Myofascial Release of the neck help?

By using gentle pressure on trigger points or using long flowing stretching strokes helps release myofascial pain. This when applied to tight neck and or shoulders helps relieve the pain and increase mobility.

  • Ease neck and shoulder tension
  • Improve shoulder range
  • Ease headaches
  • Make you more upright
  • The best of all, it will just make you feel great!

Myofascial Release Technique

See the Video demo here or see below for an easy description.

upper traps, self trigger point knots, tension headaches treatmentThe upper trapezius (traps) knot up very regularly and cause you to feel tight, hunched over and can often cause stress and tension headaches. All you need is a firm massage ball and do the following exercise for a great myofascial release:

TP UT1

Lie on your back with your knees bent up and place the ball under your upper traps as shown.  You will be able to feel the knots and tight muscles through this area (they will feel harder, often tender and like a marble or golf ball).

Self trigger point of upper traps and stress pointsNext bring your arm up and back towards the ground and then oscillate it up and down (grind it!).

Tip: If you do not feel it much, lift your bottom off the ground and put all your weight through the ball.

This is a fantastic technique and once you have tried you will see what I mean! For the is best results and long-lasting relief, do this every evening or as a break at work.

This myofascial release is great to combine with a couple of other things that will combine to create a long-term fix! It is important to look at the muscles (which we are doing here) AND the joints, so try out this easy spinal self-mobilization or this back stretch your mobility.

Let me know how you get on!

Please share and like and if you want more self-treatment exercises, check out our great Ebook

Pro-tip: If you get headaches with your neck pain you could well have cervicogenic headaches – check out more info in this post form Headache Proof

Here is a great product on amazon that helps relax neck and shoulder pain.


Health, Mobility, Shoulder pain, Upper limb

Shoulder Stretches: Only the Best

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Shoulder stretching is an essential part of gaining a Pain-free, functional and strong shoulder. Whether you have had shoulder injury in the past, have tight shoulders due to poor work posture or you just want to have full range for an overhead squat – then these shoulder stretches and for you – all of you!

(Skip down the page if you want to get straight to the Shoulder Stretches!)

Following injury: regaining flexibility and range in the joints and soft tissues is an important aspect to the rehab process and if not addressed, you can develop other, secondary injuries such as sub-acromial impingement, postural dysfunction and any number of neck problems.

Poor posture: In today’s world, too many of us have sedentary jobs which require a lot of time sitting at a desk or behind the wheel. This leads tightness in muscles the pull your shoulders forward (namely your Pecs and Upper Traps) and weakness in muscles that hold your shoulder in a good, functional position (lower traps, Serratus ant etc). This is explained well by the Jandas Upper Crossed Syndrome.

Overhead squat and shoulder range: To hold a barbell overhead and squat down  we need great mobility around the shoulder and hip to do this safely. The main muscle that affects this is the Lat (along with your Glutes and Thoracic extension) as the come all the way from your pelvis to your shoulder.

Exercises:

Ideally you should do these everyday – You can water it down and do it less often but you will not get thew best result and it will take longer.

Horizontal abduction stretch for the shoulder. posterior capsule and deltoid stretch

1. Posterior capsule stretch:

Action: Pull your arm across your body.

Hold for 1 Minute.

 

 

Shoulder stretch for the triceps muscle and inferior capsule to decrease shoulder pain

2. Triceps and inferior capsule:

Action: gripping the elbow as shown, pull back and across.

Hold for 1 minute.

Tip: bend upper body away from side being stretched.

 

 

 

sleeper stretch for the shoulder - to stretch the post capsule and rotator cuff

3. Sleeper stretch:

Lye on your shoulder with your arm in front of you and your elbow bent to 90 degrees. using your free arm, grip your wrist and rotate it down towards your feet until you feel a moderate stretch.

Hold for 1 minute

shoulder stretch for the pectorals and thoracic spine. good for swimmers, cyclists etc4. Streamline stretch:

This is a great stretch as it stretches, Pecs , Lats and thoracic spine.

No balls – You do not have to use a Swiss/Physio ball – I use the back of my couch.

Action: when on your knee place both arms on the surface and relax your shoulder and upper back down. you can adjust the force that goes through your shoulders by moving your knees further away or closer.

Hold for 1 minute.

TIP: to get more of a tricep stretch place your hands behind your neck with elbows on the ball/couch!

5: Lat Band Stretch: 

The best way I have found for stretching Lats is using a band (a technique picked up from Crossfit) – now you can use a proper exercise band or a simple belt (yes one of the ones that holds your pants up) at home. Below is a nice simple video on how to do it:

Overhead distraction with Band

Hold for 1 minute.

Tip: you can also do this by holding on to a pole.

streamlined

And THAT my fiends is ten minutes well spent!

For Best results combine the above stretches with a good Shoulder stabilisation regime and you will really reap the rewards.

 

Note if you feel any pain (other than stretching pain) or have range of motion limitations post surgery then consult a trained health professional.

 

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neck pain, Shoulder pain, Upper limb

Scapula stabilising exercises – Beat shoulder pain for good.

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winging scapula shoulder bladeWhy does your shoulder pain not get better or keep coming back??  Scapula stability and control is often overlooked yet it is absolutely necessary for good shoulder function. Here we will increase shoulder girdle strength, stability and control to get rid of and minimise the chances of:

  • Rotator cuff impingement
  • Shoulder tendinopathy
  • Subacromial Bursitis
  • Neck pain and Headaches
  • And much more

Scapula Dyskinesia is a very very common response to shoulder pain and leads to ongoing, prolonged and frustrating shoulder pain. This is basically abnormal movement of your shoulder-blade. For more detail: Skapula dyskineia

Normal shoulder movement, strength, control and performance is fully dependent on the scapula – and not just movement but it’s stability as well. The scapula is the base that your arm works off and if you don’t have a stable base, you will be much more likely to have shoulder and neck pain – It would be like trying to walk in an earthquake!

Normally when you lift your arm, your shoulder blade rotates upwards as seen in the picture below. If your shoulder-blade doesn’t rotate – your shoulder gets jammed against it, leading to pain and tightness.

So given that Scapula Dyskinesia occurs in 68-100% of shoulder injuries, this is something that needs to be addressed in EVERY PERSON WITH SHOULDER PAIN. So below is your exercise regime to address this yourself at home or the gym.

1. Push-up Plus: skapual, serratus anterior strengthening exercises, physiotherapy, shoulder pain

keeping your body and arms straight, push your shoulders forward(body upwards and then control your shoulders back to the starting position).

Too easy? do a push up and add the press at the top of each push-up (this is the plus!)

2×12 reps (to start with!)and start on your knees if you need to.

 

2. Shoulder external rotation: shoulder ER

Remember to always keep your elbow into your side and at 90degress.

You can also do theses in side lying with a 1-2kg dumbell in your upper hand.

2 x 12reps, increase the stretch to progress.

 

 

3. Chariot Pull: chdariot pull

Keeping your arms straight and shoulder back and down, take your arms back untill they are level with your body.

2 x 12reps, increase the stretch to progress.

 

 

 

 

4. Thoracic Mobility: I have included this as if you have a stiff spine, your shoulder chariot pull, shoulder strengtheningblades are always going to be in a bad position, so it is important to address this so that you don’t get stuck at 95%!

Using either a full or preferably 1.2 foam roller (high density!) lie on it, placed below your shoulder blades as shown, bridge up and extend your arms overhead and then elbows down to your sides.

Tip: Keep your head up and chin tucked in.

spend 1-2minutes working on your spine.

Do these exercises two times daily (Ideally!) for 6 weeks for awesome shoulder stability and a pain-free shoulder.

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/47/14/877.long

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12670140

Also see:

Mobilise yourself

Beating neck pain and headaches

Please share and let me know how you get on.

 


Health, neck pain, physical therapy, physiotherapy

5 great exercises for neck pain.

• By

In this post I want to give you the tools to lay the foundations of a functional and stable, pain free neck. As with all spinal rehabilitation and retraining, there are important aspects that have to be addressed in order to achieve the end result of decreased neck pain and increased movement.

Make sure to check out my post on beating headaches arising from a tight and sore neck.

The first is kinesthetic training. This, in a nutshell, is gaining a better awareness of safe spinal movement and the neutral spine position. This is an important initial building block for the neck because, as mentioned earlier, when in pain we tend to lose proper feeling in the neck and in turn lose control of the stabilising muscles. This leads to unknowingly holding your head in a bad position (and so more neck pain!).

So first we need to discuss the neutral spinal position for the head and neck.

 

As you can see in the picture above, the image on the left is in neutral spinal position, still maintaining gentle curves. Now the image on the right has a typical poor posture of the upper back and neck, with their head jutting forward and their back rounded out. Just remember a good spinal position is not having your spine as straight as a pole or forcing yourself bolt upright!

1.1. Double chin

The first technique we will do is head retractions (I find calling it Double chins makes it far easier to remember). A great way to visualize this exercise is thinking about giving yourself an extra chin, as it has this effect when performed. To do this it is important to keep looking forward while bringing your head backward, making sure not to tilt your head down (it may help to put a finger on your chin to guide your head back).

Hold this position for 5 seconds 5 times. This can be done little and often throughout the day

Now this is an extreme of the position and we do not need to have a head this far back all the time! Rest assured.

 

1.2 Keeping moving

The second easy exercise to start doing is turning nods. This exercise is to start functionally working the core muscles of your neck and help them start feeling normal again. This is a fantastic exercise for neck pain and while at times it may feel like it isn’t doing much, believe me it works wonders on sore necks and headaches, allowing improved neck function and more feeling into the neck.

The added bonus is that it makes you keep the neck moving because as I’m sure you know when in pain we tend to stiffen up and this is not what we want at all.

Turning nods: This involves turning your head to each side and performing 3 nods on each side. These nods need to be small so that you are just moving your head on your neck. An important thing to remember with these exercises is do not push into pain! Also for some people this can feel like an awkward movement to do  or you may struggle to do the small nods – persevere and they will get better, this just shows that the muscles really are weak and lack control. This awesome exercise takes no time at all and can be done little and often throughout the day.

The second aspect is muscle re-training, you can move on to this as early as you like, progressing on as it gets easier.

The specific muscles that we want to retrain are the Deep Neck Flexors.

2. Chin tuck

The best and most used exercise is the chin tuck, which provides the basis for neck stabilization  This exercise can be done in numerous positions, including lying on your back, tummy, in four point kneeling and standing. BUT there are progressions to this exercise and you want to make sure you have each stage down before you move on.

Initial position for learning the chin tuck: lying on your back, knees bent with a towel rolled up under your head as shown so that the thickest part is under the base of your head.

Action: Tuck your chin in causing a fattening of the neck and a downward pressure to be applied to the rolled towel at the base of your neck.

How much? Begin with 10×3 second holds and progress to 10×10 seconds – 2 sets of these twice daily.

 Image

Tips

    1. place your tongue on the top of your mouth and keep your teeth apart. This will help relax the jaw and only utilise the muscles we want, deep in your neck.
    2. Do not force this exercise, it needs to be gentle
    3. Quality over quantity – keep it nice and slow and control it!

 Chin Tuck progression:

Once you have mastered the chin tuck in lying and you can do it easily in a smooth motion without tensing your jaw, then you are ready to move on and do this exercise in the other positions. I recommend progressing to four point kneeling first as this will give you great feedback having to work against gravity. You can also do the exercise in front lying and standing.

The third aspect is unloading the neck by stretching tight muscles:

3. Arm pit stretch: This is a great stretch to unload your neck and shoulder. I call it this as you are pulling your head towards your armpit!

Hold this for at 1 minute and perform 3 times daily. To get a better stretch it may help to hold on to a bench or table with the opposite hand to stop the shoulder rising up.

neck stretch for levator scapulae

4. Ear to shoulder: Keep your head looking forward and this time pull your head towards your shoulder and hold for 1 minute also 3x daily.

 neck stretch for upper trap

Exercise re-cap:

– Double chins

– Turning nods

– Chin tucks

– Arm-pit stretch

– Ear to shoulder stretch

These exercises absolutely don’t take long and can be done LITTLE AND OFTEN throughout the day.

Be sure to keep and eye out for an upcoming post on postural correction for some great self mobilization and correction techniques you can do at home and also my recent post on Self Trigger Pointing.


Health, neck pain

Headaches and Neck Pain – Self trigger pointing to abolish Knots

• By

In this post I will tell you how to get relief and get rid of headaches and annoying knot sin your neck yourself! A fantastic tool that everyone needs to know – Don’t rely on drugs, medication and heat packs – treat yourself!

First of all, I would like to say that I really believe that there is such a thing as good pain! Some of my patients may disagree with this at the time of treatment of course but if not immediately, then the day after, you will feel markedly better. A lot of this “Good pain”  is felt during trigger point release and deep massage, when the tissue is released, it feels like a weight has been lifted off your shoulder at times and relieves a lot of pain – namely Headaches and niggly Neck Pain!

Another way to look at this is a little bit of pain for a whole lot of gain!

I am going to run through a couple of techniques that you can utilise YOURSELF along with strengthening exercises to beat headaches and neck pain. These can be performed yourself or you can get someone else to do them for you:

Self-massage:

Starting position – I find that prone lying (on your back) is best as this way it is easier to relax and you aren’t using all the muscles to hold you up. You can also give it a go in sitting or another position you find comfortable.

Motion – using the hand on the same side as you want to massage, bring you hand back and place your three middle fingers on the back of your neck right below your skull. This gives you a good idea of the area you need to be massaging. Now simply using these fingers or just the index and middle gently begin massaging into the muscle using circulatory motions and remembering to keep good contact on the skin. The idea with this is to find the muscle that feels harder, tighter or knotty and work into this to warm it up, stretch it out and increase blood flow.

 If someone else is performing the massage on youlielye on your back with your head supported on a pillow, have this awesome person sit behind your head and place their hands under the upper portion of your neck on each side.

 Trigger point release: I have listed this technique second as it is best to do after light massage when the muscle is warmed up.

In the same position as described above, use your index and middle finger to find the trigger points in your sub-occipital muscles. You will find these at the back of your neck in the at the base of your skull. A trigger point as described in Beating Headaches is basically a point in a tight muscle which is especially hard and sore to touch and often refers pain up into your head.

 When one of these points is found you need to apply pressure to the point with your index finger supported by your middle finger. Apply pressure so that there is mild pain (it needs to be bearable – if you are too aggressive the muscle will bunch up more). Maintain this pressure until the pain begins to subside and at this point you need to more pressure, without taking your fingers off. This increase in pressure should be performed 2-3 times and then the pressure can be taken off. It can take ten seconds to over a minute for the pain to start easing and the muscle to relax so you need to hang in there!

Tip – give the muscle a gentle rub after this to make it feel more normal.

Next – move on to another trigger point if there are any more on the same or other side.

 Image

Note: Trigger point release can at times cause aching and an increase in pain/ headaches but improvements will show the day after.

For further information see: Beating Headaches and HeadacheProofMe


Health, neck pain, physical therapy, physiotherapy

How to get rid of Headaches – All you need to know and do

• By

By whatever name you want to call them, tension, stress or cervicogenic Headaches are a huge problem in today’s high demand, high stress world. Here you will find out what your headaches are caused by and most importantly how YOU can improve and get rid of headaches drug-free!

Many have headaches as a common occurrence, simply cannot get rid and have learnt to live with them and for the majority of headaches sufferers, this simply should not and does not need to be the case. This is because a common cause of headaches is the sub-occipital muscles of the cervical spine which in simpler terms are the muscles right at the base of the skull.

Image

And here’s the kicker – THIS CAN BE TREATED.

These headaches are called Cervicogenic headaches, also commonly known as tension headaches. The pain is experienced in the forehead, temples, around the eyes and often gets worse with prolonged postures, stress and neck pain.

Image

Starting to sound familiar? If so read on!

How do these muscles cause headaches?

The pain is essentially caused by trigger points in the muscle referring pain to different points on the head. These  are caused by a number of things, including the following, and often not by one factor in isolation.

The main causes of the trigger points are:

  1. Poor posture: poor posture causes a lot of stress on the posterior structures of the upper neck. Poor posture causes a forward head posture, which closes down of the joints of the upper spine, in turn putting stress on the supporting muscle to hold the head up while out of alignment. This stress causes the sub-occipital muscles to tighten up in order to protect the joints, which if maintained this can cause trigger points and chronic pain.
  2. Stress: when under stress, from any source then you tend to tense up your shoulders, raise your shoulder blades and tense up at the back of your neck causing a forward head posture and over activation of you global muscles. Along with this, the chemical make up in your body changes.
  3. Sports: sports that need a lot of hyper-extension such as diving and climbing and also sports that can injure and put pressure on the neck as these actions close down the joints at the back of your neck and cause muscle guarding and increased tension. Contact sports such as football and rugby also cause jarring and injury which can lead to headaches.
  4. Spinal injury – such as whiplash.
  5. Degenerative spinal disease and arthritis. These diseases cause breakdown of joint surfaces and extra bone growth causing a lot of pain and irritation. Because of this the surrounding muscles tense up to try and protect the joints, this leads to knots in the surrounding muscles which no longer function properly and can cause pain themselves.

Once trigger points are formed and you have the headaches that go untreated then often they stick around due to decreasing muscle function, with a number of factors having effect:

Image

  1. When the sub-occipital muscles tighten and form trigger points, if left untreated, these form a cycle of decreasing muscle function. The trigger points and tight muscles decrease the blood getting into these muscles leading to tighter muscles and more pain.
  2. The second major problem which adds to this cycle is loss of feeling in the neck. When in pain, the proprioceptors in the neck are inhibited, these receptors relay information  to your brain, telling you where your body is in space. Due to pain and tightness, the receptors can no longer effectively sense if your head is in the correct position and this leads to worse neck posture and also decreased movement due to trying to protect the area.
  3. The third point that adds to this cycle just like in low back pain is loss of activation of the deep stabilising muscles. The deep neck flexors are the core of your neck and in pain disorders these stabilising muscles show decreased muscle control and endurance. This leads to less stabilisation which in turn causes large global muscles such as your upper traps and levator scapulae to take of and be a nuisance.

So how do you know if you are getting cervical headaches and not migraines? Here is a quick reference table in oreder to help differentiate between tension headaches and migraines.

Cervicogenic headache

Migraine

Effectiveness of pain killers

Decreasing

Limited response

Description

Dull, aching

Described as an attack

Intensity

Variable

Severe

Effect of migraine drugs

No relief

Relief

Family history

No connection

Family history related

Neck pain

Some neck tenderness or stiffness

none

Quick test: The most significant test I use in practice everyday (if the above matches) is palpation of the offending muscles.

You can do this by feeling the sub-occipital muscles with your index finger, with the middle finger on top of it for support.  Push into the muscles gently and massage(with reasonable force) around the muscles at the base of your skull. When you come across a part of the muscles which feels harder, lumpier of slightly painful, stay there and increase the pressure – if the pain from this refers into the head similar to the headaches you get, then this is most likely a major cause or contributor of your headaches and CAN BE TREATED.

How are cervical headaches treated?

These headaches can be treated very effectively by a Physiotherapist, the aim of treatment is to:

  1. Relax the muscles, mobilize the joints.
  2. Increase muscle stabilization.
  3. Treat the causative factor if possible, such as poor posture or stress.

But as always I want you to help your self and be as independent as a possible! In subsequent posts I will let you in on how to get rid of  headaches at home:

See my posts on these techniques and if you really stick to the above three points and give them a good try, then you will achieve awesome results. Why live with the pain and discomfort if you can do something about it as easy as this. Even spending 10-20 minutes each day doing these self treatments will help! Try it for 6 weeks and you will be sleeping well again. You can more in depth knowledge from the experts and access to a full rehab plan at Headache Proof Me.

Let me know how you get on!


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