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Foot pain

Fasciitis Treatment: A Physios Guide to Fixing Heel Pain

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Do your heels hurt from a lot of walking or running? Or have you been told that you have plantar fasciitis or a heel spur? Well, you are certainly not alone!

We have developed this comprehensive guide to give you the what, why and how to help fix plantar fasciitis.

What does the plantar fascia do

The plantar fascia is a strong band of connective tissue that starts at the bottom of your heel and runs along the bottom of the foot, attaching into the toes.Think of it like a big strong rope that supports your foot and helps you move.

It is important for:

  • Maintaining your arch when walking and running
  • Stabilises your arch: As you push off your big toe, the fascia is put on more stretch, which lifts up the arch into a more stable position so you can propel yourself forward. This is called the windlass mechanism. You can see in the diagram below how when the big toe is pushed up, that pulls on and tightens the fascia, lifting the arch up. For more info on the windlass mechanism, you can see this previous post.

plantar fasciitis treatment exercises

What is plantar fasciitis

In a nutshell: It is a thickening of the plantar fascia due to overload.

A massive 4% of the population over 20 have plantar fasciitis and it is a massive cause of loss of function. It is essentially an overload injury where multiple factors combine to increase the load/pull on the fascia. This overload combined with not enough time for the tissue adapt leads to mal-adaption.

Essentially, it adapts wrong and ends up getting thicker and dysfunctional.

Other common names of Plantar Fasciitis

  • Plantar fasciopathy or fasciosis
  • Plantar heel pain

Is fasciitis inflammatory?

No. There has been shown to be some inflammation early on in the pathology but on the whole, it is not an inflammatory injury after the first 1-2 weeks.

This is why over the last ten years, a lot of the medical profession and research down around this condition have been leaning towards calling in plantar fasciopathy, not fasciitis. For now though and the purpose of this article, we will continue to call it fasciitis for continuity. (1)

Fasciitis symptoms

  • Pain upon waking and taking your first few steps –This startup pain” is because your plantar fascia and calves have been in a contracted, shortened position all night.
  • Sharp stab or a dull ache in your arch or at the heel.
  • Pain after long period sitting.
  • Pain that eases gradually in a walk or run as it warms up

Risk factors for Plantar Fasciitis

  • Limited ankle or big toe range of motion
  • High body mass index/Overweight
  • Older age,
  • Prolonged standing.

The best Plantar Fasciitis Treatment

Nplantar fasciitis treatmentow that you know the what, why and how of how fasciitis can happen, we can move on to the main thing. How you can help your plantar fasciitis get better, faster.

These are the main things that need to covered in a comprehensive treatment of plantar fasciitis

  1. De-load the fascia through alteration of exercise or load
  2. Support the foot and fascia
  3. Improve strength of the calf muscles for better control and shock absorption
  4. Reduce the pull on the plantar fascia by
    1. Improving flexibility in the calf and plantar fascia
    2. Improving ankle dorsiflexion range if needed
  5. And last but importantly, we gradually load the plantar fascia to re-align the fibres and get rid of the thickening

Here are those steps laid out in far more detail:

1. Reduce load

Plantar fasciitis happens from the repeated load on the plantar fascia without enough recovery. So, simply, to help give it a chance to recover, we need to reduce the weight bearing load to a degree. It isn’t about stopping completely, that is barely ever needed.

For Plantar Fasciitis, it is all about the relative rest

This means resting the fascia, compared to what it has been doing and what overloaded it. For example, if you were running 5 or 6 days a week, you could cut that down to 3 times per week, every second day. There isn’t a set exact guide for this but the big thing is to listen to your body. If you have more morning pain the next day then ease off a bit more and don’t do quite as much.

Not satisfied with decreasing your running or walking or too sore to keep going? Then on the rest days or as an alternative, try getting on a bike or rowing machine and get your exercise in another way.

2. Support the foot

Helping support under the plantar fascia and encouraging good foot motion can be great for relieving pain when you have plantar fasciitis. There are a few options to help here including:

  • Orthotics – These help support the medial arch and cushion the heel and are recommended for up to 1 year
  • Gel heel pads – Great to help reduce impact and give a soft surface for your heel
  • Fasciitis compression sleeves – These great socks can mimick arch taping really well and we have found they can give patients great relief

3. Improve strength

Studies have shown that people with plantar fasciitis have calf weakness, as well as ankle and calf tension2. This can increase load and contribute to fasciitis as the calf is then absorbing less impact and there is less control.

Strengthening the calf is important but often when the plantar fasciitis is irritated, it can be too sore to do. Never fear though, we have provided a couple of different levels of strengthening for you to work at daily:

level 1: Theraband Calf Strengthening

As per the picture below, push your foot down again a resistance band (TheraBand for example) and then control back up.

Repeat this for 3 sets of 12 repetitions and adjust the tension of the band to make it easier or harder

calf stengthening for plantar fasciitis

Level 2: Heel raises

Starting on two feet, and holding onto a wall if needed for support, raise up onto your forefoot as shown and then slowly control back down over three seconds.

Do this for 3 sets of 12 repetitions and when that is easy, start doing them on one leg at a time.

Note, if there is more than a little pain then start with level 1.

Calf raise, calf exercise, heel raise

4. Reduce the pull

Both the calf and the plantar fascia attach onto the heel and some fibres of the Achilles tendon actually wrap around and attach to the plantar fascia. So it makes sense that any tension in the calf, plantar fascia or ankle can increase the pull at the heel and worsen fasciitis.

Here is a quick test t see if you have enough ankle range:


easy test to measure your ankle range

If you can’t get your knee touching the wall when your foot is 10cm (4 inches) without your heel coming off the ground then you have some work to do! Here are the top three exercises to regain ankle range and reduce plantar fascia and calf tension:

1. Ankle mobilisation

Improve the dorsiflexion range in your ankle if you failed the ankle range test above. See the video demo below for an easy ankle self-mobilisation at home. Alternatively, if you don’t have a band (you can get one here if needed), you can lunge your knee back and forth towards the wall for about 3 sets of 20 reps.

YouTube player

2. Calf stretch: Hang one heel off a step at a time to stretch out your calf and hold this for 30 seconds each side.

calf stretch , soleus, gastroc - self treatment for shin splints

3. Plantar fasciitis deep massage: Use a hard ball or a massage ball to roll out the sole of your foot. Do this between the heel and balls of your foot, NOT under the heel. Do this slowly and firmly for 1-2 minutes to relieve the plantar fasciitis – You can also use a small frozen water bottle!

plantar fasciitis treatment

5. Gradually load

The final aspect of rehab is to load the plantar fascia. The idea behind this and in some recent, successful research is to treat it like a tendon injury. In tendon injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy, the tendon is thickened and the fibres and dysfunctional due to overload. The big part of tendon rehab thing that helps this a lot is putting gradually more load through the tendon. This causes the tendon to adapt and change for the better.

Looking at it like this and treating the plantar fascia like a tendon (even though it technically isn’t) looks to be gaining good results in research and the clinic and is becoming a mainstay or plantar fasciitis rehab over the last few years.

If you want to read further about this, you can check out the main research paper here, with their main conclusion being:

High-load strength training may aid in a quicker reduction in pain and improvements in function

Otherwise, if you don’t want to read a research paper:

This is the main exercise that is used to load and strengthen the plantar fascia to ultimately help fix plantar fasciitis

The high load strengthening exercise is done as per the image below. A small towel is rolled up to raise the toe up (hence, putting the plantar fascia on stretch) while doing a heel raise off a step. Go up and down slowly (count 3 seconds each) and hold at the top for 2 seconds.

This can be started two-legged and progressed to one-legged as it gets easier. You can then add a backpack with something heavy in it to add a little extra load. Keep doing this until you are pain-free.

plantar fasciitis strengthening exercise

Rathleff Et al. 2014

Conclusion:

And that’s it – all the information, treatments and tools that help fix plantar fasciitis.

Unload, Support and Gradually strengthen

Thanks for reading, you will most likely also enjoy our Comprehensive Plantar Fasciitis Rehab Guide


foot pain, Health, running

How to Run Better, The Basics

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There are a few easy things that everyone can apply to their running to decrease injury, pain and simply make running easier and faster! Today we are simply going to show you how to run better

This is perfect for those of you that have regular niggles or if you have plateaued with your running and need a way to step it up. So here is your easy guide on to how to run better and improve your run!

running cadence 1801: Cadence:

This is basically the number of steps that you take per minute and for best efficiency, this should be 90 steps per minute on each foot (180 total per minute). To achieve this, first of all, you need to measure what your current cadence is. You can do this by counting the amount of steps your right foot takes in one minute.

Try then increasing your rate (if needed) and time again in another 5 minutes. The trick is to think like you are running on an icy or slippery surface and your heels are coming up behind you. This could well feel awkward to do at first and can take weeks to get used to, but once you get used to it, running will feel much easier.

Tip: A great way to improve your running cadence and run better is to use a metronome (some examples here)

how to stop overstriding2: Don’t stride out:

When striding out the foot lands on the heel and with the leg relatively straight out. This creates a braking force up through the leg and acts to slow you down, meaning YOU have to work harder.

Run better by kicking your heels up more – don’t run with straight legs!

 

3: Think smooth, light and easy:

If you look at the best medium to long distance runners you will see they have very little upward head movement (less bobbing up and down). This means less wasted energy! So to run better, we need to lean our body weight forward more and imagine projecting yourself forward and slightly up. Practice standing 1 meter in front of a wall and leaning forward through bending at your ankles until you are about to fall forward and then come back again in order to get a feeling of shifting your body weight forward.

Exercise: Practice standing 1 meter in front of a wall and leaning forward through bending at your ankles until you are about to fall forward and then come back again in order to get a feeling of shifting your body weight forward.

Remember – Perseverance is key with this! You will feel like you can just keep running and running when this becomes second nature – and then you tell others how to run properly – I still find it amazing that no one gets taught how to run!

Lastly, check out the video below of what I think is some close to perfect (no one is perfect) running:

YouTube player

 


Heel pain

Plantar Fasciitis Exercises – a superior new approach

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Heel pain plantar fasciitis exercisesHeel pain is incredibly common and one of those injuries that can take months to years to heal. So the more that you can do to help it at home the better right? Recently there has been a shift in thinking in rehabilitation soft tissue injuries and this has brought with it a new plantar fasciitis exercises that significantly speeds up recovery.

Mechanotherapy has recently been brought back into the limelight and more focus has been put on this. Mechanotherapy is basically looking at how tissue reacts to the forces that are put through it. If you put the right progressive loading through a tissue, it will adapt and change according to that load – The body is an awesome thing and we can use this adaptation to loading to give injuries a push in the right direction to heal pain strong and fast.

A good explanation of mechanotherapy can be found here for more information.

In the past, the treatment for plantar fasciitis (which should really be called plantar fasciopathy) has been quite passive with footwear, stretching and injections being the go-to options. these definitely help, and I have written a post in the past with some great rehab exercises in it, but new research has added another dimension to the treatment of plantar fasciitis that we can add to this.

A recent new study, looking at 48 patients with plantar fasciitis, compared two treatment options which basically had one group stretching the plantar fascia and using shoe inserts and the other group doing plantar fascia specific high load strength training and shoe inserts. The results at the 3-month review mark showed a much better improvement for the patients that were doing the simple progressive exercise every second day.

New findings like this can’t be ignored as who wouldn’t want to be pain-free faster!

So what is this new progressive exercise regimen that you can add to your rehab exercises?

The exercise is a simple single leg heel raise with a towel rolled up and put under the toes to put the plantar fascia on stretch and load up the windlass mechanism.You then do a heel raise, taking 3 seconds to go up, a 2-second pause at the top and then a 3 second lowering down again.

Do 3 sets of 10 reps every second day.

As pain improves and it becomes comfortable to do for after two weeks, you can add weight to the exercise by putting some weight in a backpack (e.g. a few books or a brisk or two) to progress the exercise and progressively add more force.

Note: This exercise needs to be done slowly as described to decrease the risk of flaring up the injury

The main thing is with plantar fasciopathy is to persevere, keep at your treatment and rehab exercises as it does get better.

Thanks for reading, you will also enjoy our new and updated Comprehensive Plantar Fasciitis Rehab Guide

References:

Running-physio


Foot pain, Health, running

Numbness in toes while running? Here’s your solution

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foot numbes running - how to fixPain, tingling and numbness in toes?

 

How you tie you laces may be the problem!

 

If only all our problems were so easy to fix…

 

We all do it; sit down, slip our socks on (apart from the bare-foot runner among us) and proceed to firmly and decisively tighten and tie our laces.

Great! And away you go, but unfortunately this little ritual is often done wrong – with all the best intentions I know! But wrong none the less.

Tightening up the top few rings of our shoes as firmly as we can – ensuring stability, a firm fit and feel-good-factor right? When in reality you are strangling your foot’s blood vessels and nerves, causing paresthesia (Tingling and numbness) in your foot and more commonly, your toes.

 

nerve compression in foot causing numbnessThe human foot is an incredibly complex piece of machinery with 26 bones, 33 joints, 20 muscles and many ligaments all combining to move you around all day, taking thousands of steps and acting like a natural spring.

But it too much compression is placed on the foot – The is a lot of places for your little nerves to get trapped, pinched and compressed.

Definitely not something we want on our runs!

 

So whats the easy fix?

A lot of seasoned runners will know this and do this already but believe me they are far out numbered by those that don’t.

Answer: Tighten your laces from the toe-up. Ensuring that the last two rungs are no more than 80% of the max tension.

how to have happy, painfree feet runningThis gives your feet breathing space, which makes for much happier feet and a much happier runner!

Win, win!

Give it a go, alter than ritual and be forever better off.

 

Note: In mostcases, foot and toe numbness and mild pain are due to improper equipment or technique, so relatively easy to fix when the offending problem is sorted out. BUT  if it continues after the problems are fixed – it is time to consult a professional and check that there is no underlying pathology.

 

Thanks for reading and striving to improve yourself! Get out there and put it into practice 🙂

If you have any running related questions – head on over and ask the team at The Running Forum, a great community, that is always happy to help – and as always you can comment below.

 

You may also like: Heel pain and plantar fasciitis, heal fast and strong

 


foot pain, Health, running

Heel pain running? Check your shoes and hips…

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Plantar fasciitis treatment and exercisesHeel pain running is one of the most common running injuries and can really put the brakes on living an active life. Today we will sort out some hidden causes behind heel pain!

Heel pain running is most often caused by Plantar Fasciitis and this is what I will be writing about today. The pain will be on the base on your heel – if it is on the back of your heel where your Achilles tendon attaches to the bone, that is another matter and I see to this in a future post.

Plantar Fasciitis is the 3rd most common running injury behind “shin splints” and Achilles tendinopathy(Lopes et al, 2012), yet is something than can be improved quickly if the right things are done to help it. Earlier in the week I wrote a post explaining Plantar Fasciitis and how re rehabilitate it at home. Have a quick read of that as it gives you a good base knowledge for what we will talk about next and also shows you the exercises you should be doing if you have heel pain.

 

Why check your running (or walking) shoes?

Windlass mechanism, heel pain - self treatment and exercisesThis is very important, especially with the new craze at the moment being lightweight, flexible footwear. Giving the foot move movement is fantastic if you have great foot mobility, flexible, strong calves and fascia. But if you don’t have that then these can really increase your chances of getting heel pain OR worsen it. This is because when you are running, as the heel comes up off the ground, your big toe is pushed up, putting the fascia on the bottom of your foot on stretch. This is a natural spring-like mechanism called the windlass mechanism, which when you have heel pain, can really tug, pull and stretch at your heel – Causing you more pain and inflammation.

So what is the best footwear to wear if you have heel pain?

It doesn’t matter if you have Plantar fasciitis, achilles pain or shin splints, this applies to them all. You should wear running shoes with a supportive arch (some padding under the arch), heel support (not zero-drop shoes) and with reaonably inflexible sole. Over all it is very important to get your shoe matched for you as every persons foot is different and moves in a different way, there is no perfect or “normal” way for a foot to move.

If you are trying to venture into minimalist running shoes or even barefoot running, it is very important to do this progressively as your muscles work very differently in different foot wear or lack there of.

A recent study by Shih, Y et al 2013 showed what affects load and stress on the muscles and tendons most is your running technique and not shoes. So it is important to get you technique right (form before footwear) before heading into minimalist shoes or making any big change. The study also showed that forefoot running (which a lot of people start doing when they go into minimal or no shoes) increased the work of your calf muscles – leading to increased risk of shin pain, achilles pain and heel pain.

Hips:

Often with lower limb injuries there is glute weakness that is contributing to this. Having string hips that can control your foot and knee, absorb force and power you forward is so important and if you are not already regularly strengthening your hips, you should add this to your routine.

First of all it is good to test you hips to see if you do have a problem: Have a go at this quick balance and stability test to see how you stack up.

And HERE is the glut strengthening for you that I prepared earlier – This can really decrease your injury risk and improve not just your running but everyday function.

End note: Minimalist and flexible shoes are not a bad thing if you go about it the right way but for heel, calf or shin pain they should not be your first choice.

 

Please like, share and let me know how you get on 🙂


foot pain

Plantar Fasciitis: Heal Fast and strong

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Note: We have an updated version of this post HERE AND our new Comprehensive Plantar Fasciitis Rehab Guide

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain in adults and accounts for 10% of running injuries. I will show you the WHAT, WHY and HOW to treat it yourself!

How common is it really?

  • Accounts for 15% of all podiatry visits
  • Is bilateral (in both feet) in up to a 1/3 of cases!
  • 10% of running injuries

That’s enough stats to show you just how common this is and how important it is that you can treat and rehabilitate this yourself.  Unfortunately it is often looked at as a trivial injury and if not treated right can last for months to years, really stopping you doing what you love.

So what is it?

The plantar fascia is a strong band of connective tissue that starts at the bottom of your heel  and runs along bottom of the foot, attaching into the toes. It is important for:

  • Maintaining your arch when walking and running – tracking from your heel to the toes it stops them spreading apart as your land on and push off your foot.
  • Stabilises your foot: as you push iff your toe the fascia is put on more stretch, raising up the arch into a more stable position so you can propel yourself forward!
  • Provides proprioception – feedback to your brain about how your foot is moving
  • Facilitates good foot motion/bio-mechanics – Check out this post for the plantar fascia’s role in running and walking.

Plantar fasciitis is degeneration and a small amount of localised inflammation of the proximal fascia (the part closest to the heel). The most common area of pain is near the origin of the fascia at the base of the heel. Fasciitis happens when the fascia is overloaded, whether this be from:

  • Tight calves or Achilles.
  • Sudden increase in activity or training.
  • Poor footwear e.g. worn or over-flexible running shoes.
  • Hard training surface.
  • Arch being too high or too low
  • Or increased weight.

Plantar fasciitis treatment and exercisesThis overload produces excessive stress on the fascia leading to a lot of tiny little tears in the fascia. This causes your body to go into protective mode, starting an inflammatory (healing) reaction, which makes the fascia thicker, less flexible, more sensitive AND painful. If this is not treated properly, it gets stuck in a chronic inflammatory phase and can be very frustrating.

Symptoms – to see if you do have it:

  • Pain upon waking and taking your first few steps –This “start up pain” is because your plantar fascia and calves have been in a contracted, shortened position all night.
  • Sharp stab or dull ache in your arch or at the heel.
  • Pain after long period sitting.
  • Pain that eases gradually in a walk or run as it warms up.

The big question, so how do you get rid of it?

It is important to address all aspects contributing to  plantar fasciitis in order for it to heel strong, these include:

  • Foot wear
  • Calf tightness
  • Training volume
  • Inflammation and dysfunction of the fascia
  • Lower limb and hip muscle weakness

And this is how we you will do it:

Rehab exercises for Plantar fasciitis:

plantar fasciitis treatment1. PF rolling: In order to re-align the fibers in the plantar fascia and lengthen it out, it really needs a good deep massage. This works best with a hard ball (I use a lacrosse ball). The other option is to freeze a small water bottle full of water and roll this under your arch (the ice gives great pain relief at the end of a day!)

Roll the bottom of each arch between the heel and toes (not under the heel) for 2 minutes.

This should be done at least 2 times daily.

calf stretch , soleus, gastroc - self treatment for shin splints2. Calf stretch: Drop your heel off the edge of a step and hold it for 1-2 minutes.

This needs to be done 3 times daily (the more the better).

3. Hip strengthening: Often the foot gets more force put through it due to poor hip strength and control.  Do this Quick test to see if you have hip weakness, and if you do, then you should also seriously rehab you hips also.

4. Ice: For ten minutes at a time after a long day, exercise of when hurting.

Taping: Taping to support the arch is great for unloading the plantar fascia. Using rigid strapping tape strap from the outside of the foot to the inside, pulling it tight up the arch. See this video for an example.

Footwear: This video shows how the plantar fascia works during walking and running. You can see from this that if your toe was pushed up less when Walking (In case you didn’t watch it: As your heel comes off the ground the toe is pushed up – putting your fascia on more stretch) there would be less repetitive stress on the fascia. So wearing supportive running shoes with arch and heel support and ditching minimalist of over flexible shoes will really help this. Wearing flats all day also aggravates the fasciitis as this puts the calf on stretch which wraps under the heel and pulls on your fascia – so having some heel support is great (but not high heels!)

Orthotics: Orthotics do help this condition a hue amount if your problem is with poor foot bio-mechanics – Head along and see your local Physio or Podiatrist for a foot and gait assessment.

Training volume: it is important to decrease the load for a short time to decrease the overload on the fascia while you sort out the contributing factors (above). This may involve:

  • Walking or running halve your normal distance and then increasing this by 10% per week.
  • Decreasing training on hard surfaces and hills/steps.
  • Adding in time to stretch and warm up.
  • Remember the training rule that you should not increase your distance by more than 10% per week – this is often a big cause.

This needs to be followed to 6-12 weeks for best results and when, better you should keep looking after it so that it doesn’t happen again. Keep stretching your calf, keep your hips strong and don’t have sudden increases in activity – build up to it.

You will also benefit from:

The importance of core stability on lower limb injuries

Shin splints: What why and how to sort it

Please like, comment, share and let me know how you get on.

More reading: A good scientific paper if are detail orientated.


foot pain

The Windlass Mechanism

• By

The windlass mechanism is an integral function of the foot that is critical to efficient walking and running. I am going to tell you all about how the windlass mechanism works to help you do what you love and how to test it yourself!

What is Windless Mechanism?

The windlass mechanism is simply put, the tightening of the fascia (rope may be the better term) on the bottom of your foot as you push-off. As it tightens it acts to stop your foot collapsing by supporting your arch and helps propel your forward, conserving precious momentum and energy!

Why do we need this mechanism?

It is so incredibly important that this mechanism works. If you want to keep walking or running pain-free – you need this mechanism functioning. If it doesn’t you could end up with one of a number of injuries, including:

Not to mention the undue pressure that gets put through your knees, hips and low back.

So how does the windlass mechanism work?

Your Plantar Fascia (or aponeurosis) is a very strong band of connective tissue that begins at the base of your heel and extends along the bottom of your feet to the toes.

As you walk and run a huge amount of force is put through your feet and so the plantar fascia has a very high tensile strength to hold the foot together and prevent it collapsing.

Because the fascia runs from the heel to the toes, as the foot is put down, the fascia is stretched which stops the toes spreading away from the heel – and so keeping the arch from collapsing.

Without this we would walk with no efficiency and our feet would be continually collapsing in (over-pronating) – Not ideal.

The really fantastic part of the mechanism is at the end of the gait cycle when our heel comes off the ground. As the heel comes up and the big toe stays on the ground getting pushed up, the plantar fascia is put on further stretch.

This winds the fascia around the balls of your feel like a pulley system which shortens the distance between the heel and the balls of your feet to raise and stabilise the arch of your foot.

This means there is no weak point in the foot – it is nice and stable to that you can really push-off and not lose any force.

Check out this clear and concise video that shows the mechanism well.

Achilles Tendon Pitches in As Well

Interestingly the Achilles tendon also helps tension the plantar fascia.

This is because collagen fibers from the Achilles tendon go around the heel to blend in with the outer layer of the plantar fascia.

This is a great example of how the body is connected and really works in synergy and not in isolation. This connection can also have a negative effect on the plantar fascia if the calves are too tight but we will address this in a future post.

Check out Windlass Mechanism in action at home – Test is yourself

Have a buddy standing up, fully weight-bearing and then you lift their big toe (they need to be putting their weight through the foot).

You will see the inside arch lift up as you lift the toe up. This is exactly what happens (or close to anyway) when you step through and push-off your big toe!

This is a really simple test but it can tell you so much. The windlass mechanism could be:

  • Delayed
  • Not happening at all
  • Or needing a lot of force to initiate

And it is also a great test to see if your orthotics do in fact help: Do the test standing on the ground and then standing on your orthotic and see if:

  • It is easier to lift the big toe
  • The arch rises up easier or smoother
  • The arch lifts up quicker or earlier.

Summary

This is another pretty cool example of how our body is an amazing machine! A simple little mechanism and yet it makes us be able to run far, fast and smoothly while absorbing shock and preventing injury. And it’s an important aspect for any health professional to check for any lower limb or back injury.

A good example of an injury where the Windlass mechanism is often not working is Plantar Fasciitis, so if you have arch or heel pain when walking, running and getting up in the morning – check this page out for exercises to rehab it and for your own sake – Don’t wear flip-flops.

Stay tuned in!


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