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heel pain exercises

Heel pain

Plantar Fasciitis Exercises – a superior new approach

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Heel pain plantar fasciitis exercisesHeel pain is incredibly common and one of those injuries that can take months to years to heal. So the more that you can do to help it at home the better right? Recently there has been a shift in thinking in rehabilitation soft tissue injuries and this has brought with it a new plantar fasciitis exercises that significantly speeds up recovery.

Mechanotherapy has recently been brought back into the limelight and more focus has been put on this. Mechanotherapy is basically looking at how tissue reacts to the forces that are put through it. If you put the right progressive loading through a tissue, it will adapt and change according to that load – The body is an awesome thing and we can use this adaptation to loading to give injuries a push in the right direction to heal pain strong and fast.

A good explanation of mechanotherapy can be found here for more information.

In the past, the treatment for plantar fasciitis (which should really be called plantar fasciopathy) has been quite passive with footwear, stretching and injections being the go-to options. these definitely help, and I have written a post in the past with some great rehab exercises in it, but new research has added another dimension to the treatment of plantar fasciitis that we can add to this.

A recent new study, looking at 48 patients with plantar fasciitis, compared two treatment options which basically had one group stretching the plantar fascia and using shoe inserts and the other group doing plantar fascia specific high load strength training and shoe inserts. The results at the 3-month review mark showed a much better improvement for the patients that were doing the simple progressive exercise every second day.

New findings like this can’t be ignored as who wouldn’t want to be pain-free faster!

So what is this new progressive exercise regimen that you can add to your rehab exercises?

The exercise is a simple single leg heel raise with a towel rolled up and put under the toes to put the plantar fascia on stretch and load up the windlass mechanism.You then do a heel raise, taking 3 seconds to go up, a 2-second pause at the top and then a 3 second lowering down again.

Do 3 sets of 10 reps every second day.

As pain improves and it becomes comfortable to do for after two weeks, you can add weight to the exercise by putting some weight in a backpack (e.g. a few books or a brisk or two) to progress the exercise and progressively add more force.

Note: This exercise needs to be done slowly as described to decrease the risk of flaring up the injury

The main thing is with plantar fasciopathy is to persevere, keep at your treatment and rehab exercises as it does get better.

Thanks for reading, you will also enjoy our new and updated Comprehensive Plantar Fasciitis Rehab Guide

References:

Running-physio


Foot pain, Health, Lower limb

Arch Pain? Easy Self-Treatment

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sore-feet - myofascial releaseIn today’s world of concrete pavements, cushioned shoes and sedentary lifestyles – Our feet get stiff, imbalanced, achy and neglected. This often leads to arch pain and plantar fasciitis (or fasciopathy) but luckily these is a way to help loosen off your arch!

It is time to take 2 minutes to wake up your feet and get them loose and mobile again with one simple exercise.

Our feet lay the base for our entire body to work off and they really are an amazing piece of machinery, they:

  • Absorb impact
  • Propel us forward with spring-like mechanisms (see more here)
  • Have cat-like reflexes
  • Balance out and lay the foundations for our whole upright body

The amazing human footplantar fascia - myofascial release : This BBC documentary on the human foot gives a great insight into all the structures that combine to give the foot the ability to take all of our weight, day in day out. At 18-19 minutes you can see the plantar fascia that runs along the bottom of your feet clearly and how it gets tensioned as you walk, acting like a spring – this is the spring that you are going oil up with this treatment today!

YouTube player

The feet really do have a lot to do, and have a lot of weight and forces going through them every single day. This combined with us tending to keep them cramped up in fabric coffins for the better part of the day, or even worse in flat shoes and flip-flops – leaves them needing a little R & R.

So how can you say “thank you feet” and give them some relaxation and mobility?

Myofascial release foot pain, plantar fasciitisTake a ball, any ball will do (I prefer to use a lacrosse ball as they are grippy and firm) but the firmer, the better. Place it under you foot, apply some pressure and slowly roll it around the bottom of your foot.

Maintain a comfortable pressure, while rolling it into all the tight spots in the sole of your foot – namely the inner arch and outer arches of your feet between your heel and the ball of your feet.

Do this for two minutes on each foot and feel the difference. You do this while standing or sitting (under the desk at work even), so really there is no excuses 🙂

This is a great little exercise to really loosen up the Fascia (connective tissue), massage the muscles and mobilize the bones, and as a bonus, it increases your flexibility.

Myofascial release foot, plantar fascia

As a quick test to see if your tight feet are affecting your flexibility – before you start the myofascial release, slide both hands down your legs and see how far down you can get (toe touch), and remember how far down you get. Roll out both feet for two minutes each and then re-test – Most of you will be pleasantly surprised that you get significantly lower down

And YES if you have Plantar Fasciitis or Heel spurs – This will really help you.

So, if you have any foot arch pain, heel pain, calf pain or just generally want to look after your hard working feet – Take a few minutes out of your day and get this done and you will be much better off for it.

Thanks for reading, you will most likely also enjoy our Comprehensive Plantar Fasciitis Rehab Guide and these past blog posts:

Please share, like or comment if you want more


foot pain, Health, running

Heel pain running? Check your shoes and hips…

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Plantar fasciitis treatment and exercisesHeel pain running is one of the most common running injuries and can really put the brakes on living an active life. Today we will sort out some hidden causes behind heel pain!

Heel pain running is most often caused by Plantar Fasciitis and this is what I will be writing about today. The pain will be on the base on your heel – if it is on the back of your heel where your Achilles tendon attaches to the bone, that is another matter and I see to this in a future post.

Plantar Fasciitis is the 3rd most common running injury behind “shin splints” and Achilles tendinopathy(Lopes et al, 2012), yet is something than can be improved quickly if the right things are done to help it. Earlier in the week I wrote a post explaining Plantar Fasciitis and how re rehabilitate it at home. Have a quick read of that as it gives you a good base knowledge for what we will talk about next and also shows you the exercises you should be doing if you have heel pain.

 

Why check your running (or walking) shoes?

Windlass mechanism, heel pain - self treatment and exercisesThis is very important, especially with the new craze at the moment being lightweight, flexible footwear. Giving the foot move movement is fantastic if you have great foot mobility, flexible, strong calves and fascia. But if you don’t have that then these can really increase your chances of getting heel pain OR worsen it. This is because when you are running, as the heel comes up off the ground, your big toe is pushed up, putting the fascia on the bottom of your foot on stretch. This is a natural spring-like mechanism called the windlass mechanism, which when you have heel pain, can really tug, pull and stretch at your heel – Causing you more pain and inflammation.

So what is the best footwear to wear if you have heel pain?

It doesn’t matter if you have Plantar fasciitis, achilles pain or shin splints, this applies to them all. You should wear running shoes with a supportive arch (some padding under the arch), heel support (not zero-drop shoes) and with reaonably inflexible sole. Over all it is very important to get your shoe matched for you as every persons foot is different and moves in a different way, there is no perfect or “normal” way for a foot to move.

If you are trying to venture into minimalist running shoes or even barefoot running, it is very important to do this progressively as your muscles work very differently in different foot wear or lack there of.

A recent study by Shih, Y et al 2013 showed what affects load and stress on the muscles and tendons most is your running technique and not shoes. So it is important to get you technique right (form before footwear) before heading into minimalist shoes or making any big change. The study also showed that forefoot running (which a lot of people start doing when they go into minimal or no shoes) increased the work of your calf muscles – leading to increased risk of shin pain, achilles pain and heel pain.

Hips:

Often with lower limb injuries there is glute weakness that is contributing to this. Having string hips that can control your foot and knee, absorb force and power you forward is so important and if you are not already regularly strengthening your hips, you should add this to your routine.

First of all it is good to test you hips to see if you do have a problem: Have a go at this quick balance and stability test to see how you stack up.

And HERE is the glut strengthening for you that I prepared earlier – This can really decrease your injury risk and improve not just your running but everyday function.

End note: Minimalist and flexible shoes are not a bad thing if you go about it the right way but for heel, calf or shin pain they should not be your first choice.

 

Please like, share and let me know how you get on 🙂


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