Browsing Tag

shoulder pain

Back pain, Health, Hip pain

The Best Glute Stretch

August 25, 2015 • By

This is the stretch my patients rave about the most and about the only stretch they keep doing once injury free – because it makes you feel so much better – and gets results! So give this glute stretch a shot, it can really work wonders.

The great thing is that the title is not an exaggeration.

First of all I will show you the glute stretch and a video to make sure you are doing it right and then I’ll fill you in on why it is so good for your hips, knees shoulders and especially your low back.

 

The Best Glute Stretch:

What you’re stretching:

  • the best glute stretchYour glutes, hamstrings and other hip rotators. All of these muscles at the back of your hips get stretched out here to unload the pull on your low back and hips. This also increases the mobility of your hip joint by increasing the rotation – which is essential for something as simple as walking, but also for sports such as golf where hip rotation is crucial.

 

  • Lat stretchYour latissimus dorsi is stretched out when you bring your arm across your body as shown in the video. When tight the lats can pull your shoulder down and forward, so great to stretch out!

 

Try and do this stretch daily and make it part of your routine as it can work wonders, but as with other exercises, it isn’t a quick fix!


Health, Shoulder pain, Upper limb

Shoulder dislocations – Don’t brush it off – Prevent Re-injury Now

September 2, 2014 • By

Have you had a shoulder dislocation physioshoulder dislocation playing contact sport? If you are young and want to keep playing sport – you are at massive risk of re-injury.

There is growing evidence that if a young athlete dislocates his shoulder and plays a physically demanding contact sport – They should have surgery. This is because the shoulder becomes unstable following this and the chances of further dislocations are incredibly high.

In a study by Slaa et al, it was found that:

  • Over-all recurrence rate of 24%
  • There is a huge 64% recurrence rate in patients under 20 years of age

Also a literature review found an average recurrence rate of 67%, with much less chance of re-injury if the patient is older than 40 years of age.

The most important findings in these studies are that you have very high chance of sustaining further dislocations if you are an athlete (82% – simonet and Cofield) and/or are a young person.

 

shoulder labral tearA large part of this is because damage has occurred to the labrum – This is the tissue that helps make the shoulder socket larger and suck the ball of the shoulder joint in. If the labrum is torn (which it often is in shoulder dislocation) this causes a break in the negative pressure in the joint – it has lost the suction – meaning it is easier to “pop out” again.

 

Thedislocated shoulder, do you need surgery? shoulder joint has a tiny socket to start with!

Think of shoulder joint like a golf ball sitting on a tee – The ball of the shoulder is much larger than the socket (the tee), so to make the socket larger, the labrum comes off the socket to add more stability.

 

So if you have dislocated your shoulder, are young and/or want to continue playing a contact sport…

  • Go have your shoulder assessed by your Physio
  • Get referred to an orthopedic specialist if they deem it necessary
  • Rehab your shoulder well and get your rotator cuff as strong and stable as you can.

Do it right the first time.

 

Yours in good in health,

Shaun

 


Mobility

Is Your Shoulder Mobility good enough? Quick Test

June 23, 2014 • By

shoulder mobility, get full shoulder rangeSwimmers, wight-lifters, cross fitters and more – you need full overhead shoulder range to prevent injury and perform well  – but how do you know if your shoulder mobility is up to scratch?

Do this easy test to see whet your overhead shoulder mobility is like!

All you need to do is lie on a bench, bed or table with your owns straight out in front (why it is often known as the superman test).

 

Combined extension test for swimmers shoulder rangeAction: Keeping your head down the entire time, raise both arms up as high as you can.

Now, you will need either a camera or someone else watching as you wont be able to see.

Pass or Fail?

For optimal range your arms need to be at least horizontal – See the photo above, the long red line is the horizon line and the other is the arm line. In this example, this is roughly negative 20 degrees of overhead range. This is a fail!

 

How to improve this?

 

What now? Get out there, find a helper and test yourself – this is very important range that, if below par is a real risk factor for injury, not just for your shoulder, but your neck and back.

 

You might also enjoy:

 


Mobility, neck pain, Shoulder pain

Myofascial Release: Tight neck and shoulder self-treatment!

November 14, 2013 • By

Everyone gets tight neck and shoulders, whether you are an athlete, office worker or new-mum and this easy myofascial release will give you huge relief!

Not only will this exercise ease neck and shoulder tension but also improve shoulder range, ease headaches, make you more upright and just make you feel great!

See the Video demo here or see below for an easy description.

upper traps, self trigger point knots, tension headaches treatmentThe upper trapezius (traps) knot up very regularly and cause you to feel tight, hunched over and can often cause stress and tension headaches. All you need as a firm self-massage/trigger point ball (Lacrosse ball is great if you’re in the USA!) and do the following exercise for a great myofascial release:

 

 

 

 

 

TP UT1Lie on your back with your knees bent up and place the ball under your upper traps as shown.  You will be able to feel the knots and tight muscles through this area (they will feel harder, often tender and like a marble or golf ball).

 

 

 

 

 

Self trigger point of upper traps and stress pointsNext bring your arm up and back towards the ground and then oscillate it up and down (grind it!).

Tip: If you do not feel it much, lift your bottom off the ground and put all your weight through the ball.

This is a fantastic technique and once you have tried you will see what I mean! For the is best results and long-lasting relief, do this every evening or as a break at work.

This myofascial release is great to combine with a couple of other things that will combine to create a long-term fix! It is important to look at the muscles (which we are doing here) AND the joints, so try out this easy spinal self-mobilization or this back stretch your mobility.

Let me know how you get on!

Please share and like and if you want more self-treatment exercises, check out our great Ebook

 


Health, Mobility, Shoulder pain, Upper limb

Shoulder Stretches: Only the Best

October 21, 2013 • By

Shoulder stretching is an essential part of gaining a Pain-free, functional and strong shoulder. Whether you have had shoulder injury in the past, have tight shoulders due to poor work posture or you just want to have full range for an overhead squat – then these shoulder stretches and for you – all of you!

(Skip down the page if you want to get straight to the Shoulder Stretches!)

Following injury: regaining flexibility and range in the joints and soft tissues is an important aspect to the rehab process and if not addressed, you can develop other, secondary injuries such as sub-acromial impingement, postural dysfunction and any number of neck problems.

Poor posture: In today’s world, too many of us have sedentary jobs which require a lot of time sitting at a desk or behind the wheel. This leads tightness in muscles the pull your shoulders forward (namely your Pecs and Upper Traps) and weakness in muscles that hold your shoulder in a good, functional position (lower traps, Serratus ant etc). This is explained well by the Jandas Upper Crossed Syndrome.

Overhead squat and shoulder range: To hold a barbell overhead and squat down  we need great mobility around the shoulder and hip to do this safely. The main muscle that affects this is the Lat (along with your Glutes and Thoracic extension) as the come all the way from your pelvis to your shoulder.

Exercises:

Ideally you should do these everyday – You can water it down and do it less often but you will not get thew best result and it will take longer.

Horizontal abduction stretch for the shoulder. posterior capsule and deltoid stretch

1. Posterior capsule stretch:

Action: Pull your arm across your body.

Hold for 1 Minute.

 

 

Shoulder stretch for the triceps muscle and inferior capsule to decrease shoulder pain

2. Triceps and inferior capsule:

Action: gripping the elbow as shown, pull back and across.

Hold for 1 minute.

Tip: bend upper body away from side being stretched.

 

 

 

sleeper stretch for the shoulder - to stretch the post capsule and rotator cuff

3. Sleeper stretch:

Lye on your shoulder with your arm in front of you and your elbow bent to 90 degrees. using your free arm, grip your wrist and rotate it down towards your feet until you feel a moderate stretch.

Hold for 1 minute

shoulder stretch for the pectorals and thoracic spine. good for swimmers, cyclists etc4. Streamline stretch:

This is a great stretch as it stretches, Pecs , Lats and thoracic spine.

No balls – You do not have to use a Swiss/Physio ball – I use the back of my couch.

Action: when on your knee place both arms on the surface and relax your shoulder and upper back down. you can adjust the force that goes through your shoulders by moving your knees further away or closer.

Hold for 1 minute.

TIP: to get more of a tricep stretch place your hands behind your neck with elbows on the ball/couch!

5: Lat Band Stretch: 

The best way I have found for stretching Lats is using a band (a technique picked up from Crossfit) – now you can use a proper exercise band or a simple belt (yes one of the ones that holds your pants up) at home. Below is a nice simple video on how to do it:

Overhead distraction with Band

Hold for 1 minute.

Tip: you can also do this by holding on to a pole.

streamlined

And THAT my fiends is ten minutes well spent!

For Best results combine the above stretches with a good Shoulder stabilisation regime and you will really reap the rewards.

 

Note if you feel any pain (other than stretching pain) or have range of motion limitations post surgery then consult a trained health professional.

 

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